Tag Archives: nutrition for athletes

Buy One Get One Membership Sale – through December 20th!

BOGOThis is the last week to take advantage of our never-before offered Buy One Get One Membership Sale at the Fox Valley Grappling Club. When you commit to a membership (6 months for martial arts/3 months for Fight Fit fitness), you automatically get another similar membership for a friend or family member. This is valid for all of our regular adult programs, including boxing/kickboxing, Brazilian jiu-jitsu/Judo, and Fight Fit fitness. And, you don’t need to be in the same program as your partner! For example, you can buy a membership for BJJ and have your friend use their membership for boxing/kickboxing. We also have a number of flexible payment options, including splitting payments between two people, discounts for paying up-front, and monthly payment programs! Contact us for more information!

Consistency: Maintain the Basics and Always Look Forward!

We all have those friends and teammates whose mantra seems to be “It’s time for me to get back into shape/get back to training…and I am serious this time!” They start coming to the gym three or four days a week and start making some progress…But the commitment seems to wane quickly and they end up back where they started 3 months ago.

starting over

Martial arts and fitness are not in the list of activities that are like riding a bicycle. You can leave your bike in the garage all winter and still ride it in the spring with ease.  You stay out of the gym for the winter and you will have more than a little rust to shake off. There are two main reasons for this:

  1. The loss of physical strength and stamina due to inactivity/inconsistency should be a huge motivator for people with health and fitness or martial arts goals. Studies show that it can take as little as 2 weeks for your conditioning levels to plunge on a number of fronts! A few months of little to no training can undo months and months of prior work. Workout sessions that once seemed easy end up being incredibly challenging and frustrating after just a short period of time off.
  2. Meanwhile, progression in a sport such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu requires consistent work and focus to learn, polish, and fix techniques. It takes consistent up-keep of your body control and basics in order to focus on new techniques and positions. Purple belts need to be able to recall white belt and blue belt basics with no problem in order to focus on something more advanced.

So you must ask yourself: Why start over and “start training hard” every 6 months when you can stay at a reasonable and consistent pace, gradually improving all the time? Why worry about getting your wind back when you could be focusing on that new body movement or trying a kettlebell swing with a heavier weight than last week? Why worry about having your body be able to do a perfect basic arm bar because you keep taking time off, when you could be improving your guard game with more advanced sweeps? It seems like a simple answer to me.

NEVER LOOK BACK; MAINTAIN THE BASICS SO YOU CAN ALWAYS BE LOOKING FORWARD! And, if you have been out for awhile, make sure your plan to come back can be maintained over the long-term, not just for a few short months!

Happy training!

Treating Food as Fuel

So, we go to the BJJ academy 3-6 days per week; some of us exercise outside of the academy; some do extra strength and conditioning classes at the academy. So, we’re healthy athletes, right? Well, it depends. Whether you like it or not, it’s not just the classes and workouts that we do that make us the kind of athlete and jiu-jitsu fighter that we are. It is, in fact, proper nutrition that can make you or break you. That is, we need to think of food as fuel.

Unless you were blessed by genetics with the metabolism of a hummingbird (i.e., really high), do not put terrible fuel into your body and expect to look like an Adonis (i.e., chiseled as a marble statue). Your body is not, in fact, an engine designed to run on Doritos and Ho-Hos and other highly-processed, chemical-ridden foods, or a lot of red meat. I know, I know: That “All Bacon” diet seems like a great idea at first glance, but I would reconsider.

We have “proper nutrition” down to a science these days; it can become extremely complicated, especially when you start following special diets, such as a completely vegan diet (no animal products, ever). But getting the right fuel in your body doesn’t have to be complicated or overwhelming. Just follow some simple rules:

1. Keep your processed food intake to a minimum. This means, lots of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and basic, lean meats (if you are not vegetarian). Along this vein, I would recommend not eating out frequently, even at supposedly more healthful restaurants.
2. At each meal, try to get a good carbohydrate source AND a good protein source, especially at breakfast and post-workout.
3. Eat small portions more frequently, rather than one or two huge meals. Let your metabolism keep up with you!
4. Eat lots of veggies and drink plenty of water with each meal and/or snack.

If you don’t know where to start, I recommend keeping a food journal; awareness is the first step. Sometimes you don’t realize how much your “treats” really add up, or that you are not getting enough protein to replace what you lost during your workout until you look at it on paper. Keep your journal for at least a week; you may be surprised!