Category Archives: Tournaments

Congratulations to MMA Fighter Matt Brown!

matty_belts

Team FVGC Coach Matt Brown

Congratulations to our Team FVGC member and coach Matt Brown for his August 15th victory in Detroit! Matt is a talented and dedicated fighter whose hard work paid off and brought him home the WXC Warrior Xtreme Championship belt.

We are so proud of Matt and look forward to his next fight in which he will defend his RFA belt in Minnesota on Friday, October 10th!

Team FVGC Sends Competitors to the Pan-American Championships

The International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation Pan American Championships will be held in Irvine, CA, March 12-16, 2014. It is one of the most prestigious Brazilian jiu-jitsu tournaments in the world and Team FVGC will be there! danalexjames

Head coach James Peterson is a 2x Pan-American Champion and a Master and Seniors Worlds medalist, as well as a Chicago International Open Champion. This will be the first year he is competing in the black belt division. Purple belt Alexandra Rathbone is a 3x Chicago International Open Champion and is looking to bring home her first Pan-Am medal. Purple belt and Chicago Open Champion Dan Williams is also looking to bring back his first Pan-Am medal.

This trip would not be possible without the generous support of our sponsors. Please patronize the following businesses to say thank you for supporting local athletes!

 

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Intention: Metamoris and the Problem with the BJJ Community

After watching Metamoris II this weekend, I have come to the conclusion that the Brazilian jiu-jitsu community has a problem determining intention.

The Metamoris tournament series was created in part to combat the disturbing growth of jiu jitsu fighters not only winning by points or advantages, but aiming to win in that manner without truly attacking or gaining dominant position. The Metamoris tournament was an attempt to force fighters to move, attack, work diligently for the submission, and not be afraid to get put onto their butt for a moment or two. It seems to be part of the backlash against the 50/50 and other stalling open guard games in the competitive jiu-jitsu community (Yes, this shirt exists). The Metamoris tournament seems to also be an answer the “Self-Defense Jiu jitsu” community, which has criticized IBJJF-style jiu-jitsu for getting away from the so-called true nature and root of BJJ.

Enter Brandon Schaub and Ryron Gracie, representatives of the Gracie Academy and the self-defense BJJ community. In their fights, they both were the less dominant fighters, with Ryron coming to a draw (no submission by Galvao) and Schaub losing (decision, different rules in Metamoris II). And yet, post-fight interviews found them arrogant and declaring their fights

schaub

a success based on what their own objective was, which seems to be simply neutralizing their opponent, rather than controlling and submitting. I don’t think that there is anything wrong with training BJJ strictly for self-defense. But, we also need to remember that self-defense jiu-jitsu does not translate into a tournament format: The objective is to extract yourself from a dangerous situation (and yes, you should run if you can). Self-defense jiu-jitsu is not better than competitive BJJ and vice versa; the INTENTION IS DIFFERENT.

 

In my opinion it is poor sportsmanship and just poor taste to declare victory based on a strategy that isn’t congruent with the rules and objective of the tournament, just like it is in poor taste (and logic) to declare that a competition–driven fighter would not be able to defend themselves or declare that the 50/50 guard is a good way to end a street fight safely. In the end, it seems to be about politics and marketing. Let’s not go down that road. Jiu-jitsu is beautiful; let’s keep it that way.

Combating our Panic: Training for Self-Defense and Competition in Jiu-jitsu

The other day I was teaching beginner Brazilian jiu jitsu in our Appleton school. It is a class in which we have a somewhat wide variety of experience levels, especially when you consider what 3 months of classes does for someone just starting out. So, when it comes to open rolling for the class, I keep a careful eye on all the matches for everyone’s safety and to coach the newbies a little bit. When I looked over I saw one of my 140lb. white belt girls battling with a grown man outweighing her by 60lbs and with at least a year of experience on her. She was on the bottom in side mount and then mount, struggling to escape. The guy she was rolling wasn’t being too rough or a jerk, he was just big and holding decent position. She was fighting, fighting, fighting. All of a sudden, her face changed. I could see the frustration and beginning of tears. She got overwhelmed and lost her will and focus; she made mistakes and was submitted.

jiu-jitsu-mount

It is one thing to get your butt kicked in jiu jitsu, to feel like you fought the good fight, to feel like you were just outclassed by your friend that day … but feeling overwhelmed by someone’s size, strength or experience can steal the heart out of your chest.  THIS IS HUGE! It is an important thing to pay attention to whether you are in Gracie jiu-jitsu for self-defense or competition because being overwhelmed leads to PANIC. When we panic, we lose our heads, lose our focus, lose our strategy, lose our technique, and lose the fight.

How do we combat the panic we may feel during live roll? We can do it the same way we can combat any other fear, whether it is a fear of competing, a fear of heights, a fear of public speaking, etc. We practice! We immerse ourselves in the situation until it is no big deal…We compete once per month, we climb a rock wall on a regular basis, we do a presentation or announcement in front of our peers every week at work. When we are used to being in what we perceive as a bad situation, our brains and bodies kick in and do the work to protect us, just as they have practiced 1,000 times. So, we need to roll live and put ourselves in tight spots on a regular basis so we feel good while we roll in practice, so we stay calm when we compete, so we don’t panic when someone grabs us and we need to seriously defend ourselves on the street.

Happy rolling.

Failure…Not for the weak of forehead

Failure-is-not-falling-down-but-refusing-to-get-upWe’ve all heard the saying or at least some variation of it. It is, of course, true. We all get knocked down, pushed off track, and epically fail at something in our lives at one time or another (or again, and again, and again).

 epic fail

Learning to fail is easier said than done sometimes; and even those that feel like they generally have a good grasp on it still have those moments of weakness where the anger and embarrassment get overwhelming. (I would lie if I said I have never lost my cool on the mat or after a competition). It is especially difficult to keep perspective when you fail at something that you have invested yourself into, whether it is your time, money, dedication, hard work, sweat, blood, tears, etc.

To me, keeping your perspective when you have failed means taking the experiences that you have had and learning from them. Why sweep your failures under the rug? Why forget your mistakes? The greatest learning experiences come when you must face the consequences of your mistakes! Sometimes you know exactly went wrong (I was triangled at a tournament after putting my arm between the legs in sidemount top…never again); sometimes it takes a few hours in the gym to understand really what went wrong and how you would prevent it next time (after burning out and losing my third match on points at the 2012 Pan-Ams, I came home and worked on my composure and the mental side of my game for months).

The trouble that many run into is being able to hang onto failures to improve oneself without obsessing over them, beating themselves down with them, trashing their self-confidence. Part of “getting back up” is striking a balance between learning and self-forgiveness.  Sometimes, you just have to brush it off and start over (below is me, getting Vaporized by my teammate…again). Happy training everyone.

dirtytroyAppleton Jiu Jitsu

Just how big is 135 lbs.?

No matter how big or small the tournament, I think it must be human nature to be constantly sizing up your competition.

The second I walk into a tournament, I instantly become some kind of secret agent, sitting in my spot ever-so-non-nonchalantly, looking at every woman within 100 yards to see if she is in my weight class. The thing about me is that, in addition to being blessed with poor depth perception, I am terrible at guessing what people weigh (I guess I’ll never get that job at the county fair). Yet, I continue to obsess (nonchalantly) over how truly dense a muffin top or good bicep is. She may be as tall as I am, but the density is the real issue.

It only gets worse…What belt is she? What body type is she? Would she pull guard or try to hip throw me? And on, and on, and on.

It turns out (as most of us know in our guts) that you should not worry about guessing how many girls you see that may or may not be in your bracket and just focus on whipping ass. This weekend at Combat Corner Vol 8. in Milwaukee, it didn’t matter what the other girls weighed or what body type they had; I played my game for all three matches and brought home some gold. Close to fight time, the focus needs to turn to your game plan and warming up, keeping the nerves under control and not caring who is on the mat with you. The confidence has to be there (or fake it until you make it); and the confidence will be there if you train and prepare the right way.